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Anatomy of Speed Series - How to Stretch for Improved Speed & Endurance


Robb Beams

Over the last three articles we have set the foundation to begin training in a way to maximize your training efforts, now let’s address the other side of the performance equation – flexibility (also referred to as stretching) specific to the legs and lower back region (we will discuss the shoulders and back in two weeks).

Stretching, when implemented correctly is an actual preventive tool – it reduces the risk of injury by increasing the circulation to your muscles & joints, relaxing your muscles and allowing for greater range of motion.

Soft Tissue Maintenance

As stated by Michael Boyle, soft tissue goes by many names depending who you are speaking with: physical therapists use the term soft tissue mobilization; chiropractors use the term Active Release Technique and massage therapists call it deep tissue work. Regardless of what you want to call soft tissue, the common factor is the goal of optimizing the range of motion within the muscle and surrounding joint(s). Though beyond the scope of this article, soft tissue manipulation is actually an irritating stimulus manually created which produces a chemical response within the soft tissue. The chemicals produced are what actual begins the healing processes and a cellular level. This is why soft tissue work is often painful during treatment and can leave you sore and achy for a couple days following treatment.

Stretch Reflex

Your body is equipped with a stretch reflex know as the myotatic stretch reflex which prevents a muscle from stretching too far and/or too fast, this mechanism protects the surrounding joint from becoming injured. This stretch reflex is mediated through the muscle spindle cells and is constantly evaluating both the speed and length that muscle is going through. When a muscle lengthens either too far or quickly, the spindle cell is stimulated and reflexively causes the muscle to contract, resisting the lengthening and preventing overstretching of the joint.

An additional component to the stretch reflex is a concept known as the Inverse Stretch Reflex. Though this component is beyond the scope of this article, this reflex engages the Golgi tendon organ which monitors the amount of stress being placed on the tendon at the attachment. It is the combination of the myotatic stretch reflex and the inverse stretch reflex that causes the muscle to relax, lengthen and ultimately increase your range of motion.

Trigger Points

When you picture a muscle, small dense areas develop within the muscle tissue creating small “knots”; visualize a rope with small knots in it, if you pull on each end hard, then knots get tighter – this is exactly what happens when you try to stretch without untying the knots – you only make the trigger points “tighter” which results in a reduced range of motion (i.e. flexibility).

Pain-Spasm-Pain Cycle

When a muscle develops a “knot”, it falls into a Pain-Spasm-Pain cycle. The muscle begins to get tight, the tightness creates pain (usually at the attachments) and because of repetitive use, becomes progressively tighter which eventually resulting in a limited range of motion or ultimately a locked position where it hurts to move at all (and keeps you from maintaining optimum biomechanics and efficiency).

Proper Warm Up

Step 1: roll your major muscle groups – click here for a series of foam rolling videos for your lower body Step 2: sport specific activity at a low heart rate (until the body is sweating and the muscle temperature is optimized) Step 3: isolate and stretch your primary and secondary muscles – click here for a series of videos for isolating & stretching your lower body muscles Step 4: implement dynamic movements to optimize your range of motion before adding the velocity of the bike Step 5: begin your sport specific workouts to improve your strength, endurance and/or lactate tolerance. Please email me if you would like some motocross specific workouts to improve all three of these categories.

Which Muscles to Roll, Isolate and Stretch For Improved Speed & Endurance Starts: starts are all about having your lower leg “gripping” the bike; however, if the inner thigh muscles are tight, they will not grip tight enough resulting in a bike that isn’t stable. Solution: roll your inner thighs – click here for video and fast forward to the: 54 mark.

Whoops: the faster you go through the whoops, the greater the range of motion and strength necessary in your calves, quads and hamstrings. Solution: roll your quads, hamstrings, ITB and calves.

Jumping: jumping is about having your lower leg “gripping” the bike; however, if the inner thigh muscles are tight, they will not grip tight enough resulting in a bike that isn’t stable. Solution: roll your inner thighs – click here for video and fast forward to the: 54 mark.

Cornering: before you can corner successfully, you have to have the strength and flexibility to raise your foot high enough in the corners. Unfortunately, most racers don’t have the flexibility & strength in the hip flexors to keep the foot high enough to execute corners effectively. Solution: roll your quads,& hamstrings to improve your flexibility within the hip flexors and hip joint.

Acceleration: holding onto the bike as it accelerates is about having your legs “gripping” the bike; however, if the inner thigh muscles are tight, they will not grip tight enough resulting in a bike that isn’t stable. Solution: roll your inner thighs – click here for video and fast forward to the: 54 mark.

Deceleration: holding onto the bike requires optimum range of motion and strength in your calves, quads and hamstrings. Solution: roll your quads, hamstrings, ITB and calves.

Where to purchase a foam roller: PerformBetter.com

Next week I will post training weeks #3 and #4. The following week, I will break down the upper body and core muscles for improved speed & endurance. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly.

Coach Robb has been working with riders & racers since 1987 and is the founder of the Complete Racing Solutions Performance Program, the Mental Blueprint of Success, MotoE Amateur Development Program & Nutritionally Green Supplements based out Orlando Florida.

coachrobb.com is a premium resource center for motocross, supercross and GNCC riders of all abilities and ages. Visit his website & subscribe to his bi-monthly newsletter that outlines the training solutions used with great success by multi time Loretta Lynn’s & Mini O Champion’s Jordan Bailey (Factory Red Bull/KTM) & Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit’s Adam Cianciarulo, national champion & Factory JGR/Yamaha’s Jon Jon Ames, Yamaha’s GNCC Quad racer Roman Brown and thousands of riders around the world.

Instructional videos with Coach Robb can be found on the Coach Robb’s Youtube Channel addressing rider’s questions about speed, endurance, strength nutrition, biomechanics, and stretching and soft tissue maintenance. Please visit coachrobb.com to subscribe to his newsletter and learn more about various resources for riders. You can follow him on Twitter: @MotoCoachRobb and on Facebook: Coach Robb.

Coach Robb is a regular contributor to Vurbmoto.com, Racer XVT, FLMX & FTR Magazine and various websites. Robb can also be heard on the monthly radio show DMXS answering listener’s questions about nutrition & fitness.

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